16mm 8mm Super 8 Movie Film Transfers
Video8 Hi8 D8 MiniDV VHS VHS-C Transfers

You NEED to know this about film and video transfers --
and you NEED to know ALOT MORE!

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<b>16mm film</b> <b>8mm film</b><b>Super 8mm</b>film Film Transfer Comparisons (PICTURE)

16mm Film, 8mm Film & Super 8 Film PRIMER

For Beginners...

A little Primer on 16mm film, Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) and Super 8mm movie film.

The following tutorial is for people new to

This primer will help you both identify and date
16mm film, Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film), and Super 8mm movie films that you have -- for film transfer.

I HAVE LOCATED THIS PRIMER ON MY FIRST PAGE,
SO YOU CAN FIND IT (AGAIN) QUICK AND EASY -- TO FIGURE OUT WHAT KIND OF film YOU HAVE.
IF YOU NEED HELP, THE BEST TIME TO CALL US IS MON THU SAT -- 2PM TO 7PM MOUNTAIN STANDARD TIME.
MY STAFF OR I WILL BE HAPPY TO HELP YOU FIGURE IT ALL OUT AND ANSWER QUESTIONS!
575-377-1001 (SOME CELL PHONES DO NOT LIKE A "1" IN FRONT OF THIS NUMBER. OUR PHONE DOES WORK)

al">How to Identify, Date, and Speed-rate Your Movie film for film Transfer: :
Picture (Above) shows examples of "small format" movie film s

16mm movie film,
Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) (also called Standard 8mm movie film ) and
Super 8mm movie movie film.

16mm was invented before Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) and Super 8mm movie films. 16mm movie film was made from "hand-milled "Silver halide -- the grains of which were very large compared to later films. Although 16mm is 4 times the size of Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) and Super 8mm movie film, the resolution of the film is comparable to that of Super 8mm movie film and some later dating Also, 16mm movie film was shot and run at 16fps in the early 1900's. Modern versions of 16mm movie film are run at 24 fps -- which actually makes 16mm movie film a "hybrid" format -- with one foot in the "small format film industry" and one foot in the "large format film industry".

It is because of this dual role of 16mm movie film, that 'Film Transfer Mills™ can "get away with" talking about film and equipment in broad terms and then implying that what is "good" for large format films -- like captures with "irregular pull-down patterns" -- is likewise, "good" for "small format films". In truth the converse ONLY is true, that what is "good" for "small format films" -- like synchronizations at "15fps" -- is also "good" for "large format films" -- but NOT VISA VERSA.

Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) and 16mm movie film

Rough Dating of Movie film :
16mm movie film - silent -- 1923 to Early 1960's.
16mm movie film - sound - 1935 to present.
Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film), Standard 8mm movie film -- Late 1932 thru 1990s.
Super 8mm movie film -- Introduced in 1965 to present.

Correct film Transfer Speeds:
Silent 16mm film - silent -15 fps or 16 fps (with exceptions) with 40 frames per foot
Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) film - silent -15 fps or 16 fps. with 80 frames per foot

NOTE: Film Transfer Mills™ transfer this at 20 fps
Introducing a 20% "real-time" distortion - 12 minutes lost per hour.

Super 8mm movie film

Super 8mm movie film was "Shot" usually 18 fps; commercially 24 fps and has 72 frames per foot
Super 8mm movie Movie cameras and projectors had "variable speeds".

Correct film Transfer Speeds:
Super 8mm movie film "Silent", 18 fps
Super 8mm movie film "Sound", 18 fps OR 24 fps.
NOTE: Film Transfer Mills™ transfer this at 20 fps
Introducing a 10% "real-time" distortion - 6 minutes lost per hour.

Super 8 Film Sound for Film Transfer (Click to Refresh Pictures) NOTE: Super 8 Sound film has "magnetic "Sound tracks glued on both edges of the "under-side" of the film which looks like 2 copper colored stripes (see above).

<b>16mm film</b> Optical Sound track for Film Transfer (Click to Refresh Pictures) Commercial film : Super 8mm movie Sound and 16mm Sound: Usually "optical "Sound tracks. (Black squiggly tracks: above)

Both 16mm movie film and Super 8mm movie movie COMMERCIAL films, were "Shot and run" at 24 fps - ONLY.
Most domestic clients, with rare exceptions, do NOT have "commercial films" with "optical sound tracks".

<b>16mm film</b> <b>8mm film</b><b>Super 8mm</b>film for Film Transfer (Click to Refresh Pictures)
Holes Along the Edge of the film (see picture above) :
The size of the holes are the same for both 16mm movie film and Standard 8mm movie film.
Some 16mm has only one set of holes -- like Regular 8 film.
Spacing of the holes in 16mm movie film is different than Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) -- also called Standard 8 film.

Super 8mm movie movie film has smaller holes - less than half the size of Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) movie film. Spacing is different.
Correct film Transfer is very different for each.

Reels or Spools (see Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) pictures below):

Hole in Center of Reel or Spool:
Early 16mm and Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film): the hole in a spool was
1) the size of a number 2 pencil -- on one side of the spool -- and 2) square and roughly the same size -- on the other side of the spool.

Later, 16mm spools standardized with a square hole.
Later, Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) spools standardized with a round hole -- with a notch on one side of the reel or both.

Super 8mm movie spool: The hole in the spool was the size of your "pinky finger" and round on both sides of the spool.

8mm Film Boxes of "double 8" for <b>8mm film</b> Transfer (Click to Refresh Pictures)

Standard 8mm movie film , 95 percent of the time, is on a grey plastic, 3 inch spool and came in a Yellow cardboard box -- for mailing.

Double 8 movie film came in a yellow box roughly 1 inch thick.
Single 8 also called Standard 8 came in a yellow box roughly 1/2 inch thick.

Both types of films -- collectively -- are called Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) or Standard 8mm movie film and, before 1965, usually fond on little grey plastic reels -- with excepts around 1942 (see history below), and 1965 (more follows)..

Super 8 movie film (introduced in 1965) was sold and processed on 50 foot spools -- which were usually a blue cover with a white plastic spool.. Rarely covers were also red, yellow, green, black, and white.

About that same time (1965), Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) began to appear spooled onto white plastic reels with blue covers, too.. The hole in those spools was the size of a number 2 pencil or standard pen. Most easily confused with Super 8mm movie film.

ATTENTION: : It is very common for Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) to be on a Super 8mm movie spool and Super 8mm movie film, on a Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) spool -- by mistake of family members. When in doubt , look at the film itself and the size of the holes in the film -- not the spool.

HISTORICAL NOTE - TO HELP DATE AND IDENTIFY: Earliest Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) or Standard 8 film was called Double 8, because it was sold as 25 feet of 16mm movie film. It was called a "25 foot Double 8".

The tell-tell oversized, yellow box contained a tiny back metal canister -- sealed with black cotton tape -- to protect the brown, unexposed 16mm movie film inside.

The 16mm movie film was "double exposed" -- in 2 passes. Each pass -- exposing the entire length of the 16mm wide film -- but only exposed an Standard 8mm movie film wide strip along the length of the16mm movie film.

The cameraman would shoot one pass and then flip the 16mm movie film in the camera -- to shoot the second pass. This accounts for the "flashes of yellow light" half-way through early Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film)s.

At the time of film processing, the 16mm movie film was developed and then split down the center -- thus creating 2 strips of Standard 8mm movie film. . The two ends of the (now Standard 8mm movie ) film was glued together in the center and spooled onto a 50 foot spool of Standard 8mm movie film (shown below). This is nice to know if you need to date reels of film.


(Click to Refresh Pictures)

All 3 reels above are Double 8mm 25 foot movie film -- which is actually 2 strips of 25 foot film -- glued together (doubled) to make a 50 foot spool.

Proof of this is the splice located exactly dead center of the length of movie film.

DATING INFORMATION:Double 8mm & Standard 8mm Movie Films

  1. (left top) Double 8mm 25 foot movie film reel -- aluminum (shown) or black metal reel (not shown) (pre-WWII), or

  2. (center bottom) Double 8mm 25 foot movie film reel a cardboard reel (WWII), or

  3. (right top) Double 8mm 25 foot movie film OR Standard 8mm movie film reel -- a grey plastic reel (post-WWII)

    In the1950s Kodok started spooling a solid 50 foot strip of film onto the same plastic grey reels (above right); however, the little yellow box (not shown) was only half the width of the yellow Double 8mm box (above).


Double 8mm 25 foot movie film was shipped back to owner in the same oversize yellow box -- now twice the length and half the width of the original 25 foot reel of 16mm movie film.

WARNING:Because the box "looks too big for the reel", many people wrongly assume the reel is in the "wrong box". This is one of the major reasons reels become disassociated from the correct box.

NOTE: Many times the cameraman would forget that the film had already been exposed and flipped -- and would expose the same edge twice. Thus "double exposures" were created on Double 8 film.

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TECHNICAL NOTES (VERY BORING)
ON
MOVIE Film Telecine TRANSFER SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS:

The " tech note" below is on film transfer semantics on 16mm film, Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film), and Super 8mm movie film. Most readers have some "flavor" of Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) or Super 8mm movie film. Therefore, I do not specifically state the words "16mm movie film " -- every time I mention Super 8mm movie film or Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) -- when talking about film transfers to DVD or Master Files. Instead, I just talk about Standard 8mm film, and Super 8mm movie film to film transfers -- with the ASSUMPTION THAT ALL PRINCIPLES APPLY TO 16mm movie film AS WELL.

The same applies to visual and non-visual illustrations -- using Standard 8mm movie film or Super 8mm movie film or film transfer. Illustrations about Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) ALSO APPLIES to SILENT 16mm movie film -- as Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) -- (see photos above) in may cases IS SILENT 16mm movie film-- "SPLIT IN HALF -- DOWN THE CENTER" literally.

A 16mm movie film transfer can be much more complex than a Standard 8mm movie film or Super 8mm movie film transfer -- because 16mm movie film was used domestically, commercially -- as 16mm silent movie film and 16mm sound movie film -- and shot at 1 of 3 speeds -- even early century 1900s. Also 16mm movie film is OLDER and usually is in some stage of "vinegar syndrome". After you get a telecine film transfer quote, you are advised to call me about your 16mm movie film for a free 16mm movie film transfer "evaluation and consult".

I use Standard 8mm movie film (Regular 8mm movie film) or Super 8mm movie terms -- for example:

Super 8mm movie film to DVD,
Super 8mm movie film transfer,
Standard 8mm movie film to H.264,
Super 8mm movie film transfer,
Single Standard 8mm movie film to HDTV Blu-ray,
Standard 8mm movie film to video,
Double Standard 8mm movie film to video,
Standard 8mm movie film to video,
Standard 8mm movie film movie to video,
Standard 8mm movie film telecine,
Standard 8mm movie telecine film transfer,
Standard 8mm movie film telecine transfer,
Ektasound Standard 8mm movie film to DVD,
Ektachrome Standard 8mm movie film to DVD,
Kodachrome Standard 8mm movie film to DVD.
film to video,
film to Flash Drive,
film to Hard Drive,
film to Blu-ray, etc

ALL these film transfer phrases refer to some "film to video film transfer process" of converting film to digital video unless otherwise stated specifically..