Dirty Secrets of DVD Longevity Studies:
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Newsletter Banning DVDs for Archive Purposes

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Dirty Secrets of DVD Longevity Studies:
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)
Newsletter

  Pacific Currents
A Regional Newsletter
(of the)
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) - Pacific Region
Laguna Niguel, Riverside, & San Bruno, California

October 2007
Volume 7, Issue 1

Optical Storage for Federal Records

Agencies are increasingly relying on optical storage media - CDs and DVDs for storage of business records and other information.
Here's a summary of recently released NARA guidance.

NARAs™ complete FAQs about CDs and DVDs are available on-line:

● Frequently Asked Questions About Optical Media
● Frequently Asked Questions About Optical Storage Media:

Storing Temporary Records on CDs and DVDs

To read the original source of this document, click here:
http://www.archives.gov/records-mgmt/newsletter/currents/2007-october.pdf  

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) National Archives: Current Public Advisory:

Recordable (DVD) optical media have widely varying life expectancies. It is not entirely uncommon for some discs to become unreadable in less than 1 year. Relying on recordable discs to last for generations is probably not viable.   

SOURCE: http://www.archives.gov/preservation/formats/video-condition-assessment.html     

Burned (recordable CD-R, DVD-R, BD-R) discs make use of an organic dye layer in order to record data and are typically less reliable because this dye is more susceptible to degradation over time. Recordable CDs, Blu-Rays, and DVDs have proven to be fairly unstable over time, and are deemed a bad choice for long-term preservation.

Source: http://www.archives.gov/preservation/formats/video-important-characteristics.html